Thursday, August 5, 2010

cut test...

Took half a day to narrow down my best options on the transparent corrugated polycarbonate.  Lunched at "you know where" and they were swamped with customers today.  Shot home to clean up for a brief tour.  

Worked the afternoon away planning the final assault on the roof system.  Just had to accomplish some facet of physical labor to photograph, so I marked and cut a piece of tin to flush out the SW edge of the roof. A cutting wheel on the grinder beats the hell out of tin snips - especially for an eight foot long slice.  92,99,75,0,B

10 comments:

zwango said...

A four inch grinder with the appropriate wheel is the best cutting tool I own.

Mikey Sklar said...

The abrasive blades work well. I recommend a framing saw. We often cut up to 5 sheets at a time and get perfect lines.

D. B. Day IV said...

Yep, a Skill saw with a metal blade works really well. Some even just turn a wood blade around backward for the job.

frann said...

Wear a dust mask..I worry about you!

Billy Bob said...

I see it's too late to suggest a skill saw. Oh well, I was think'n bout ya anyhows.

wroughtn said...

John, you can cut the metal lengthwise with a box knife, yep, your utility knife will cut it just fine.

What you have to do is score a line with the knife. Do this a couple of times and then fold the sheet, it'll pop and split. I do it all time with twenty six gauge R and U panels.

HD carries the Metal Demon for skill saws. I use a worm drive (framers heavy duty saw) and cut everything from half inch plate to sheets like you're using.

Well, it isn't that easy. For the thin stuff I use a thin stuff blade. It has almost twice the teeth and costs a lot more and you have to order them through industrial supply houses. The Metal Demon doesn't last long on thin stuff like the sheets and purlins you're cutting. But cutting stuff like pipe and bar stock you will be pleasantly surprised at how long they last.

wroughtn said...

I also have and use a nibbler and an electric shear.

The nibbler has one character flaw that's hard to get around. It throws steel clippings not unlike toe nail clippings, cazillions of them. The only way you can pick them up is with a magnet. Even then they get in your clothes which means every now and then you think a cactus is wanting to have a relationship.

The shear works great on straight lines but doesn't like the waves and corners like the nibbler does. However, it doesn't throw nasty chips like the nibbler will.

Speaking of nasty chips. That is an issue with the Detal Demon. You better have on your safety glasses, long sleeve shirt, and some gloves. The "sawdust" is hot and sharp and there's plenty of it.

You ought to see the client's face when I pull out my framing saw instead of the cutting torch to cut some half or three quarter inch plate. It cuts cleaner and almost as fast. For some reason the thicker the steel the better it cuts.

A framing saw will pop a twenty amp breaker if they're weak or the cords are long. I don't know it that's an issue in your world.

Gavin said...

Lots of great info in the comments. Tool tips are real gems.

The place looks wonderful John. I bet the Longhorns are trying to find the best shade spots now.

2L84Me said...

JW
The Skill saw tip is a dangerous way to go. Do NOT use carbide tipped blades in that manner as the tips will fly off like a bullet. What D.B. should have said is to use a blade for metal or a metal wood blade without carbide tips. I minor mistake but I have investigated a number of accident where this has been the case.
Keep up the good work and be Safe!

I said...

hey where did my funny comment go?