Friday, August 22, 2014

rotten bottom

Never fails...bathrooms are notorious for leaks.  This 36 year old Airstream has had its' share of water working wrong.  Looks like I will have to replace most of the steel under this section.  I think the only thing that has been holding the end up is the exterior skin.  90,102,71,0,B

5 comments:

Rev.jimmyleebob said...

Never fails is right ! Hidden gems I call it..well, that ought to keep you out of trouble for awhile...wait, I'm thinking about me, idle hands and the devil's workshop thing...BTW...shame to lose that zebra flooring..

Unknown said...

You have always had a good sense of needing to dig deeper to see the whole problem, then being creative in resolving it. I'm sure you are the right man for the job.

Margery Bills said...

The first time I saw my parents Airstream was 49 years ago and I don't know how old it was then. It seems Airstreams have retained the same look over the years. These trailers can be fixed up so nicely on the inside. Not all amenities are necessary such as a bathroom (added camping removable port-a-potty and outside shower) or a full kitchen (just added removable appliances). It would be nice if you could make the trailer roadworthy (fun trips). A collapsible awning outside for some protection from sun and rain would be nice. Interesting project.

M. Silvius said...

There are alternatives.
http://www.tailwindsplease.com/usa-flyingroad-trip/modifying-the-trailer/

Zoomnx said...

110% correct there, even with good stamped metal frame the shell holds up the frame.

The frame is a glorified axle mounting bracket - it uses the weight and lateral-diagonal stiffening of the plywood to soak up the baseline roadway jounce the axles/shocks pass along to keep the eggshell stiff aluminum shell intact over the long term.

The temptation to heavy-up and overbuild the iron is a kind of false improvement, it's not the best idea, get too tight and when it does move it will focus in small areas and shear rivets.

Also consider the lighter gauge out-rigger brackets as 'semi-break-away' so if/when something snags the trailer at/below the floor it won't tear up stuff as badly, bend/bust up frame elsewhere or cause the hitch to part blah blah...

Looking forward to seeing your tin cabana project proceed!