Saturday, September 27, 2014

BUSTED!


72,78,66, .09",B

20 comments:

John Wells said...

BTW...it took me an hour to figure out how to embed a YouTube video without going on to a playlist or show related videos at the end. This information can be found here: http://illuminea.com/remove-related-videos-from-end-of-embedded-youtube-video/

Dizzy-Dick said...

I didn't know you had coons in the desert. I, too, have been having problems with them. Got rid of one, but more have come.

MsBelinda said...

He looks pretty chunky to me. How did he get in? Well, the good thing is that you caught him.

Harry Flashman said...

We've all got to earn our daily crust somehow. I'm glad you didn't kill the poor fellow.

Margery Bills said...

Sorry for your loss of feed. He might have been helping himself to other edible (to him) things around your property. He was just so delicate about everything. How did he get in. Some raccoons can carry rabies.

Ronald Mahan said...

I agree with MsBelinda, that raccoon does look "pretty chunky". Like maybe has been eating range pellets for a long time. I suspect he also dines with your longhorns outside. If you stop him from getting in your storage room - you might catch with your video camera -outside dining with the longhorns. I bet that coon waits until those long horns are not close by?

John Wells said...

shhh...planning the next move. His capture is imminent.

2ligit said...

time to call the Turtleman-live action :)

Rev.jimmyleebob said...

probably been living closer than you think, maybe under your feet.Several years ago had them dug under my deck outside my back door.Proceed with caution,number 1 rabies vector here

Larry G said...

did yet another critter visiting the FL just get a name - "Chunky"?

;-)

I wonder what this guy eats in that geography when he's not dining on free pellets?

anthony murphy said...

Skinned and cooked correctly, there meat makes a pretty good meal. I have only eaten it twice. The year was 1976. Barbecued. Once for dinner. The second was the following day during my 4th. grade lunch break.

Rev.jimmyleebob said...

hahaha..I know a guy that eats em ..
wasn't going to mention it..he also hunts
feral hogs with knives and tomahawks..I try to avoid him as much as possible..way crazier than me

CJ Peek said...

Hey, where can a coon get some grub around here? At John's All Night Diner, of course. I have ro say I love this video and it made me laugh. Time for "Operation Relocation". Get yourself a live trap and take the that masked bandit to a new home...far, far away.
I have a herd if racoons I've been dealing with....they love to take moonlit baths in Lucky Hammy's (my pig) water trough and wash their hands in the cat water dish. After shredded bags of pig feed and cat food, I now keep it in 50 gal rubber trash cans with a bungee across the top from handle to handle. So far, so good. (ezrablu)

David L. Secor said...

If you don't mind me asking, what is the brand and model of the camera you are using? Seems to have a pretty good picture.

Margery Bills said...

The rubber trash cans sound good. Some people have raccoons for pets. This one has been around your place maybe since young. I have to laugh at the add where the woman calls her kitty cat in the house and since she can't see well, she goes to bed with the racoon that came in. Turtle man comes from near my ancestral area. Chunky is a good name. He made the FL his home. Poor guy.


Baggers said...

Get some more metal trash cans to store the feed in. Make sure you secure the lids with a chain or bungee cords passed through the handle on the lid and wrapped securely around the side handles otherwise they'll just learn to pop them off. They're smart critters. If there's too much feed, get some kind of larger metal or otherwise chew proof container.
As for the feed left out for the longhorns, if it doesn't bother you just get used to them sharing it otherwise you'll need to stop leaving any out overnight.
The rabies strain specific to raccoons is virtually nonexistent west of the Mississippi. They can get it through contact with another species, but they're not known as a major vector. Last time I checked the state website, the primary concerns were gray foxes, bats, and skunks and there are vaccine laced bait programs ongoing in an effort to control the disease in these animals.
Keep all outdoor food sources secured, don't try to make pets out of them, of course don't try to handle or let them bite you, and you should be perfectly safe. They're really fun to observe, so just treat them as another neighbor and enjoy.

John Wells said...

the game cam is a Moultrie M100

Unknown said...

It is somewhat unfortunate that the TFL side of the road is Vegan, yet fortunate that your new neighbor is not a black/white striped guest.
It is best that you punch his Express Travel Voucher for a 1-way adventure trip.

Ronald Mahan said...

I agree with Baggers about metal trash cans being a better option to store any kind of animal feed in. Been my experience that even small rats can go right thru plastic. Heck, a coon with those big claws would rip a big hole out - in no time. Steel defeats claws & sharp teeth! Cheers Ron Mahan

Larry G said...

I agree. we have plastic trash cans in garage and holes in the bottom from smaller critters than racoons chewing on them.