Wednesday, October 1, 2014

Strike 2

Missed again.  Three things I have learned so far:  1. The raccoon seems to really like marshmallows.  2. He is not afraid to go into the trap.
3. I need to refine the trigger mechanism.
Rigging the trap for the next attempt so that some bait is attached to the trigger instead of just hoping he bumps into it.  Am I smarter than a raccoon?  Will try again tonight.
87,94,63,0,B

19 comments:

Rev.jimmyleebob said...

Another guy having problems
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sN1eNKGbbXY

Steve said...

At this rate that raccoon is more likely to die from diabetes or heart disease.

Cardiff Chris said...

He is so cute!!! Can't we keep him? Please???!!!

Bizmark said...

Looks like the poor little guy could use something to drink to go with those treats....

Unknown said...

Try soaking marshmallow in very hot water to make it sticky and stick it onto the trigger...

M said...

Procyon lotor - I love how the raccoon felt comfortable enough to sit down and eat away. He was very cautious at first but eventually it felt at home. Get 'em John! A new friend of the Field Lab in the works.

Mauricio - Houston, Texas

Rita B. said...

He's too cute John. He really makes himself at home in there. Maybe he'd like to live up around Alpine.

Margery Bills said...

You know I think the racoon has been observing and co-habitating with you and yours since he was young. He looks so healthy and comfortable in his home. I see so many mangy, scruffy, thin dead raccoons on the road around here when they mate at night. He has apparently been politely staying out of your way but then what could he do when the door was open. Maybe he might even have been sleeping in there at times.

Ronald Mahan said...

Looks like that Raccoon is growing pretty fast. John had better trap him soon - or he will have to build a larger trap.
But then the entertaining movies would cease.

rj said...

The next problem will be when you do trap him. He will either break apart the trap (they are strong and get really mad) or he will knock it over and raise cain. They can also attack. They are not cute over sized cats...

Kevin Yorke said...

I'd check to see if he's not subscribing to your blog. Seem's to be one step ahead of you.

And what about the container projects?

Kevin

Bob from Athens said...

John I have trapped dozens of critters from rats, squirrels, possums, skunks to raccoons. One thing I have learned is that almost all of the food HAS to be even or behind the trigger. Wild animals do not like going into a trap, you have to provide a big prize for them to willingly do so. Why go all the way to the trigger when there is a ten course dinner out front. 1/2 of a marshmallow and only one or two pieces of other food out front then 1/4 of a marshmallow inside the door and another 1/4 about half way back then a good sized pile behind the trigger. Works for me.

Ron Kincaid said...

When you do trap him, be careful.
A coon will tear up a dog. They are strong animals and can hurt you. Be careful when you go to release him.

Margery Bills said...

Like I said before, I hope you had a rabies shot. A squirrel got in our country house years ago and bit one of my sons. He had to have several shots in his abdomen until the animal was determined not to have rabies.

Margery Bills said...

There is a wildlife rescue in seguin, Texas.

Margery Bills said...

I' ll have to say he has really groomed himself well while
staying around there and he appears to be a very careful relaxed fellow.

Jack said...

I'm with Bob from Athens: wedge a marshmallow or two behind the trigger, no way he can chow down without activating the trap then. Watch yourself when you go to release him, others have said it but it bears repeating, coons can be nasty.

James Price said...

It's roughly 800 miles from The Field Lab to Seguin and back.

Rev.jimmyleebob said...

I wasted my 2 remaining brain cells on the marshmallow equation....