Monday, January 8, 2018

a monday matinee...

9 comments:

John Wells said...

Last week when we had a couple of sub freezing days, Chupa was allowed in the house to warm up throughout the day. It usually doesn't take him long to doze off once he gets comfortable sitting on my lap. News Theme 2 by Audionautix is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/)
Artist: http://audionautix.com/ Retreat by Jason Farnham used by permission from the YouTube Audio Library.

David Johnson said...

Nice video

remmij said...

…I dozed off — think it was the rhythmic blinking…
good music selection again.

Margery Bills said...

Lol remmij. Yes, in Alaska where many of use lived outside in the cold, when I went inside at the shelter in Juneau for dinner, I would feel tired in the heat and sometimes shut my eyes. Some of the Native Americans could not tolerate the normal winter heat inside and would wait outside in the cold. (So, coming back to TX to my family, I felt like I had died and had wakened in Hell with the heat. But during the last cold snap, the Germans in New Braunfels looked miserable.)

Margery Bills said...

In Juneau if it was 80 degrees for more than 4 days the locals said it was a heat wave and were miserable.

Margery Bills said...

Over a few years, our blood thickens or thins according to the weather and we adjust.

John Wells said...

Margery...blood does not thicken or thin according to outside temperature. That is just a myth. This idea is often used to explain people's "mental attitude" or "physical tolerance" when moving to a different climate - but the viscosity of blood can only change due to the level of hydration or the presence of disease.

WhyR said...

Actually, blood can thicken at extreme altitudes as a response to hypoxia, or lack of oxygen:

https://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2002/05/0513_020514_ADValtitude_2.html

Brenda S said...

This was super duper cool. Chupa and I became friends. Welcome respite.