Thursday, December 10, 2015

prepping for some winter greens


70,81,47,0,B

11 comments:

jmick said...

John,
It would be interesting to see some "then and now" photographs with some insight,commentary or observations from what you have learned in the past eight years. I would guess that your perspective has changed in many ways. Thank you for the glimpses.
-Jeff

Margery Bills said...

I once had a cookbook written by an elderly man from Alabama with all kinds of techniques and recipes. It was amazing. I tried it and for the first time, I liked fresh cooked collard green, mustard greens, and Spinish, and other greens. He knew all the old methods of cooking, butchering a hog, smoking and so forth and the food was delicious.

rondeb said...

In the dead of winter (coldest in your area) what is the low temp that you register in the Greenhouse? I was just looking at winter vegetables and one of the really easy ones is Kale which is oh so good.

John Wells said...

It rarely gets below freezing inside the greenhouse...lettuce, kale, chard, and spinach do really well here in the winter.

Ronald Mahan said...

I looked at the weather forecast and it predicted highs of 79* today and 80* tomorrow - in the Terlingua Ranch area. Kind of a minimal winter!

Margery Bills said...

Yes, Rondeb, I believe it was collard greens, kale, and mustard greens cooked together slowly in a little water with salt pork and bacon for several hours and seasoned to taste. It was so good and healthy but it has been so many years ago that I forgot.

Margery Bills said...

Then there was always cornbread, grits, griddle cakes, and homemade biscuits.

Ronald Mahan said...

We didn't eat much of that great Southern food - greens - when I lived in Texas - due to being raised mostly on Germanic style cooking - which favored more of the cabbage dishes. My step-grandfather (who emigrated from Austria) kept crocks of sauerkraut and pickled herring (great snacks for young growing boys) in his pantry. However, after I relocated to Alabama to help build a new paper mill) - I learned other greens are a great food and very healthy - if you tread lightly with that salt pork!

Margery Bills said...

Yum. Interesting commentary Ronald. In the Netherlands, a herring a day (salted and dried - or something raw- and held by the tail downward and popped whole in the mouth raw --- yum, yum, yum) keeps the doctor away but two a day keeps the boyfriend away.

Margery Bills said...

I have my great grandmother's crock to put cabbage in to make sauerkraut.

Ronald Mahan said...

I used to watch my grandmother fill up her crock with cabbage - in the process of making homemade sauerkraut. But she was the last member of my family - I ever saw doing that. And I do not know what happened to the sauerkraut crock pot- which was a large glazed earthenware crock. We still eat a little sauerkraut - but it s not nearly as good! Maybe - because it is no longer homemade?