Friday, April 14, 2017

a friday night film


85,88,63, .01",B

29 comments:

John Wells said...

Been trying to get this video for weeks. Chupa has become quite adept at flying up to me - but never when I have a camera ready. I have tried this numerous times with the camera all set up and I end up looking like an idiot with my arm out as he just walks away.
He finally cooperated and along with some lucky camera framing, I got the flight...perhaps because I was wearing a BE LIKE CHUPA t-shirt. I shot the video in 1080P at 60 frames/second. Slow motion segment done in Adobe Premiere Elements 15 at 10% normal speed. News Theme and Fanfare for Space by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/)
Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/index.html?isrc=USUAN1300026
Artist: http://incompetech.com/

Janet said...

Where are your falconry gloves? Your arm wasn't bleeding so guess you're okay. Great movie! Thanks.

Sam Finn said...

That was worth the wait ... big time applause!

JohnnyM said...

This is the best ever of capturing Chupta and sharing! Made my Friday night highlight!

Dizzy-Dick said...

Just goes to prove that any living creature can be trained with enough patience and time. I see that Chupa has you trained to raise your arm for him to fly to.

Margery Bills said...

Good boy. I guess he might not stay in a fenced area very well. Another free spirit.

remmij said...

standing O!
…like a Chupa

Jon P said...

Good Man Chupa!
What kind bird is that at the start of the film flying over your house and out by been? It looked a little big for your curved beak thrasher?

Sam Finn said...

Uh-oh ... I think I might have just stumbled across the reason for the title of this movie. Thanks Jon P.

John Wells said...

...that was a dove

Sam Finn said...

I stand corrected.

John Wells said...

Chupa is the only falcon out here...

Margery Bills said...

Well, that looked like a black crow to me. It did not seem big enough for a Vulchur, but......

Margery Bills said...

Mexican-U.S. Border on t.v. Now. Things have sure changed. I was down at the border a few years ago in Laredo when I picked up a Weimareiner baby. He just got bigger and bigger and bigger (maybe has some Great Dane several generations back the vet said). That will keep the bad people away. :-) Fifty years ago when I worked in security there, there was only a tall lanky, young, blond Ranger by the road flagging people down by the inland part of the border. At the main crossing, there was just a man there who joked with me and told me my husband (former) was looking for me. :-) A lot different today-many buildings, many border men, many lanes of heavy traffic crossing, several work dogs, cameras, etc

Margery Bills said...

Buenos trades-drug wars still on t.v. On justice network. They just busted a family for money hidden in a spare tire-and they had 3 children with them. Yes, I remember those middle of the night drug deal when I was 7. My mother (and now I know she was really my mother through DNA testing), did drugs, drank, and took prescription pills all my life and until my son put her in the nursing area and she died at 92. I never knew her. She might have been a nice person and we might have been friends like I was with her mother if she had been clean and sober. People tell me that she was not evil, but sick. Yes, we lived in the same house when I was young. She never got caught until they put a breathalyzer on her car when she was around 85 and then she demanded that I blow in it when I visited.??? I did not even know what it was.

WhyR said...

Hey, new way to condense water out of dry desert air, using sunshine, once it becomes available in about 20 years: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/energy-environment/wp/2017/04/13/this-device-pulls-drinking-water-straight-out-of-the-air-and-it-runs-entirely-off-grid/?tid=a_inl&utm_term=.d716533c219b

John Wells said...

I have seen this latest "breakthrough". Beware of all these water from air inventions. No matter what they claim, they all need high humidity to actually work.

relaxin67 said...

Wow, that's incredible. Our rooster does the sideways walk, then attacks us with claws and beak to our legs (when the hens are playing hard-to-get). Maybe there's hope for him. Amazing, Chupa! Nice cinematography, too. My wife and I watched this a number of times. Thanks for the show!

WhyR said...

Damn, you're a hard nut to crack, JW. The article specifically says it would produce water in the Sahara. It relies on the increase in humidity at night. What's the RA at TFL at 4:00 in the morning? In any case, if evidence of water production is not documented by disinterested observers, which should be easy to do, it'll go away without anybody being fleeced.

John Wells said...

Most of the year out here, the relative humidity rarely gets above 25% at any time of day. I will say that when we get the occasional super foggy morning, my catchment surfaces will collect a couple of gallons just from dew alone - but that is at 100% humidity. I have probably seen at least 10 "magic water makers" on the internet the past couple of years. Sucking water out of the air isn't magic...the laws of physics cannot be broken. In areas where this kind of catchment would be most beneficial - it will never happen because no matter how advanced the technology, the humidity levels simple won't support any significant water collection. How does the saying go?...You can't get blood from a stone.

John Wells said...

Let's think about this from another point of view. For the sake of argument - a new technology that costs millions if not billions to develop using incredibly expensive materials, is somehow able to extract all the water from the most minute amount of humidity in the air. Then we have to suppose that somehow these costs can be lowered to the point where the technology can be afforded by people in third world countries that live on dollars per year. One might also consider - how is removing every drop of moisture from the atmosphere going to affect the climate? Keep in mind - these magic water stories are really about getting funding for pipe dreams and gushed over by a cozy population that could never even fathom living without an unlimited supply of tap water in their home. Note: Simply with enough catchment area and storage capacity (and no magic technology), I am able to supply myself with over 22,000 gallons of water per year with only 6 inches of rain.

JudithK said...

Oh oh. I am still laughing. Wonderful.

WhyR said...

But you still BUY your drinking water, apparently. And no one is ever going to remove all the moisture from an atmosphere in direct contact with oceans, lakes and rivers. And just for the sake of argument, "a new technology that costs millions if not billions to develop using incredibly expensive materials" is also an apt description of the development of solar panels, which have now become cheap and ubiquitous.

John Wells said...

Thanks for reminding me - I bought a cheap filter system for my rainwater just before I broke my leg and the gear is still in the boxes. I reckon it is time to put it into service. It just hasn't been a priority because the cost of drinking water is so low and knowing that in case of an emergency, I have enough rainwater on tap at any given time to last me and my plants and animals for more than a year.
As for the physics of humidity - a good start is this when considering the viability of creating drinking water "out of thin air": 4,000 cubic feet of 70° air at 100% humidity at sea level will only contain about a half gallon of water. As temperature increases and humidity decreases, the amount of water available in air goes down exponentially...and more energy is needed to extract that water as the temperature rises.
Yes...the price of solar has dropped quite a bit - commercially available panels are about 1/5 the price they were when I first moved out here. The technology started becoming viable in 1954 when researchers at Bell Labs developed the first silicon photovoltaic cell. Here we are 63 years later and the price for a complete system to energize a typical power hungry house in this country is still not exactly "cheap and ubiquitous" - and still way beyond what would be considered affordable in 3rd world countries.

WhyR said...

Again, if this device is viable or not, it will be easy to determine without anyone getting hurt financially.
Solar is combining with LED technologies to make a big difference in the economically poorest areas of the world: http://www.cnn.com/2012/01/10/tech/innovation/solar-powered-led-lamps/index.html
RE: rainwater use- Camelbak has a battery powered UV light disinfection system that recharges via USB cable to kill any remaining biological contaminants after filtration:
https://www.camelbak.com/en/bottles/purification/R02001--All_Clear?color=b68c99aff644416cb6387f164892b5d5
-you can find them for less on various sites. I've used one of these for over a year and it works.

John Wells said...

One of the few ideas I have seen promoted lately that actually makes sense. Simple is better...light with gravity. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jsc-pQIMxt8

WhyR said...

That is amazing!

Annemarie Gerber said...

In Namibia we have been reycling wee water and making beer from the same for decades with no harm whatsoever....Ein Prosit!😊

Annemarie Gerber said...

Omitted to say. Now Chupa this is one feat I"ll encore to. No wonder I thought the words on you Chupa mug should have been. Be like Chupa...Fly high!