Tuesday, August 28, 2018

Aunt Linda...










Ben had a visit from his aunt Linda today - on the sixth anniversary of their first meeting.  Ben may go to live on her ranch in Fredericksburg, TX in the fall.  She has 125 fenced acres of grass and trees and streams...and 3 young longhorn steers.  We are trying to work out the logistics of getting him there.  As much as I would like to keep him, his feed is just too expensive and I think he would have a much better life there with some buddies to hang out with and lots of room to roam.  93,99,69,T,B  

16 comments:

Dizzy-Dick said...

But he will miss you and you will miss him. . .

Janet said...

If you love him, you have to set him free. It sounds like an idyllic life for Ben. This change will be good for you too. Have you ever thought about moving to Fredericksburg :)

Rita B. said...

This sounds like an excellent plan.

Margery Bills said...

Oh John that breaks my heart. You will both miss each other so much. I once rehomed a good young dog to a good home. I realize he saw me at a vet at a distance and I did not think of him at first. But I got a call and he had run away to find me. Animals grieve and miss people they love and they do have feelings. But if you have no choice, that sounds ideal. Sometimes we have to do things that we will still miss and think about years later and wish we had not done that but at the time it seemed best. Fredericksburg is a rich, good area. So will you get another dog or a cat now? A chicken does not seem like enough. At least now you can travel.

MsBelinda said...

Ben is like an only child, he is so used to having your attention but most importantly your LOVE. While he will have new buddies and room to roam nothing will replace YOU.

Margery Bills said...

Where I live, there is a Homeowners Association and no farm animals can stay here to keep this area upper class. I cannot have goats (chickens now allowed with the Mexicans moving here). The Association is being sued by the man now because the man across the street raises Bulls by the twos and I guess there has finally been some objection from the retired people moving in what they thought was a good area. At six months he sells them and gets about $3,000.00 each. He can do it because his daughter is in 4-H and it is supposed to be a learning expedience. So he built another house here from the sales and another lot for the Bulls plus he has his own house. I really do not pay any attention to it. He just has ranching in his blood but has to stay over here now away from his ranch for his contsruction job plus he is married to an important lady here from an old-line family. Problems, problems, problems. (I found out a rescue dog from DNA is 1/3 red wolf - of course not allowed, but he is very gentle and smart).

Margery Bills said...

Of course I could be mistaken about that 1/3 unidentifiable. He could just be a Shepherd, Catahoiula mongrel. I had gray, tundra, and buffalo wolves in Alaska and they were my life. Years ago a lady here had 6 wolves and she was court ordered to not keep them, so I never got wolves here for that reason.

linda said...

I know you will miss him but it sounds like a great idea 🤗

Margery Bills said...

In the mid 1800's Prince Solms of Germany was deeded land which became New Braunfels, TX, the nearest town to me. In the late l800's some of the German settlers from there left and for months where several died traveled across what is now Devils Backbone Rd. on the top of the hills just north of Canyon Lake where I live. They say there are spirits (including Indian Natives) around here. The Germans arrived at what is today Fredericksburg, TX, about 60 miles or so from here. But this time the settlers befriended the Comanche Natives who helped them. Today the city is a lovely, artsie tourist town with good German restaurants. It is zoned (no trailers, etc.) and expensive. A lady who grew up in San Marcos near here wrote a fiction book based on fact and it is called Hill Country. It won awards and is good. She even wrote about Comanche massacres in the not too distant past (late 1800's) of settlers. Usually ranch land around here is passed down to family and not sold to strangers.

Margery Bills said...

(I remember in the mid 50's when I was the lucky one who got a job in town at the Chamber of Commerce in San Angelo, TX, in the office -a good job for a girl, plus I was married, another bonus, I was known at the Yankee who caused the Civil War and heard all the horrors of the past. What? Actually my great, great, great Uncle was Jefferson Davis on my father's side. But then I was told I was just trying to be someone. Oh, well. Times have changed. I never hear Yankee in public anymore. This state was settled by all people from everywhere. Today I can even get immediate service in a restaurant when I go in alone without a man (what a relief) and if I do not in the country, I walk out. And my mother has a same grandfather as Ulysses Grant and grew up in his area).

Robert said...

Well he is a herd animal and you are not his kind and I'm sure he'll let you visit and give him a brush.

Janet said...

Well, Margery, you have certainly had a full and interesting life.

bob r said...

feed??? hay, supplements, help me

Zole said...

I for one will miss seeing Ben, but John is giving him much needed companionship.

pamit said...

Glad to hear you are thinking of giving Ben a "new lease on life" with a few of his own species. Huzzah!

Big D said...

sheesh i think i'd like to have aunt linda adopt me!!! she a doll and i loves texas!