Monday, April 2, 2018

a monday matinee...

10 comments:

John Wells said...

My first batch of croissants - the final roll out, cutting, shaping, and baking. It all went exactly according to plan and they came out pretty dang good. The final dough was four tri-folds which yielded 81 layers of butter. The next batch I am going to change the egg wash. I used a whole egg with a little milk for this test. Next batch, I will only use egg whites so they will be lighter in color. News Theme 2 by Audionautix is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/...)
Artist: http://audionautix.com/ Ishikari Lore by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/...)
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Zole said...

They look great! I can almost taste them!
How long to cook in the oven?

John Wells said...

26 minutes

James Price said...

YUM!

Margery Bills said...

Yes!

WhyR said...

Seriously, remmij was right: think beardnet. Protect your fine product and all your hard work.
Food production companies figured this all out many years ago.

Rita B. said...

Those look fabulous! And so tasty.

Margery Bills said...

Did you know you had this talent? They say men make better chefs for instance than women. Plus they can usually lift heavier weights. Do you patent your product? A college friend of my parents made special dishes for college parties. Guess who. He was the founder of Wish Bone Salad Dressing and became very wealthy.

John Wells said...

Margery...I have known how to cook for 40 years. A recipe may be successfully patented only if it meets several criteria. First, the recipe in question must be novel. That means it cannot be a food item previously familiar to the public or an obvious combination of pre-existing food items - and baking bread in a solar oven is not novel. So no... I cannot patent my products.

kellymckillop said...

These look amazing.