Saturday, May 7, 2011

LED

  http://www.ledsmagazine.com/features/4/8/1  http://www.sparkfun.com/categories/174 

Had a long chat today with my IT guy in the UK about LED's.  He passed on some links for me to consider.  Sifting through the info got me to thinking about how I'm going to lay out the interior of the container house while considering all the lighting possibilities. 

Saturday quiz - what is the object in the photo? (it's about 5/8" diameter)  92,103,54,0,B

23 comments:

Jim said...

Could it be from a dung beetle?

Rob said...

Something manufactured by an insect.

JLP said...

It is a bug nest of some kind.

aHunkaHunkaBurningLove said...

a bead?

aHunkaHunkaBurningLove said...

maybe a piece of slag that has rusted a little bit.

Gavin said...

Those LED links are great. I'm not sure if it's true but bugs are not supposed to be attracted to LED lights as they do not give off the IR and UV light frequencies which bugs sense. Not sure if it's true but LED's are a good choice in a low power setup.

Ricky said...

is it a wasps nest from a yucca plant

Peter Malin said...

Hummingbird's nest

Riverhauler said...

Looks like a left handed Spud Nut off of a 1947 Clydehanger.

ezrablu said...

a klingon

:D

Wm. Pugh said...

A dirt dobber nest.
Really sad one to...

Just Me said...

Looks like a potter wasp nest to me. If so, these are great insects to have around because they help control various pest species. Great YouTube video
shows variety of pests controlled by potter wasps.

Good link on the LEDs. Also check out this Instructable.

Nancy said...

a bunny poop that an insect has carved into a bowl shape

Cindy said...

A sad mud dobber nest... glad I wasn't the only one who had that thought.

vbklein said...

nutmeg

tffnguy said...

Gavin, In Plano Texas it seemed that no bugs could see the LEDs and they didn't attract bugs. Down here I guess we have special bugs that are attracted to them. They do attract some bugs down here. Moths, flying aunts and others.

leilani said...

Well, it's either 1) a dung beetle's nest as Jim said right out of the gate on the first post or 2) a rare (& very valuable) example of a petrified malted milk ball.

But I'll guess the former, since pterodactyls native to the Chihuahuan desert were not known for their fondness for Hershey's Whoppers.(Most paleontologists agree they preferred Nestle Raisinets.)

frann said...

Turd

Quixote Kid said...

I love LED technology and it's finally starting to become affordable for some of the blue LED's that are EXTREMELY close to white. We just had a tech class at work on Thursday about these and I ordered some to play with.

I also found some pre made GE LED white lights that you can daisy chain together. I already got them in and they are great! (cant find a link from my phone), but they are already in a housing with a switch. Down side is that they are converted to 120 VAC so I think there is some (a lot?) of loss if you are inverting from DC to AC, then bac down to DC again. Could probably hack into them and make them a lot more efficient.

Looking forward to your continued progress.

Michael Peck said...

I think Frann said it most succinctly. It's a turd

Cindy said...

Did Benita get flowers (to eat) for Mother's Day? or some other lovely treat? After all, she probably has had more children than most of your readers.... wish her a great day for me.

Stooth said...

I think it is a plant hull or husk of some sort. Like the cap of an acorn?

Gavin said...

tffnguy, I guess Moths and some other insects might be attracted to visible light, but maybe Mosquitoes and other bitting insects are more attracted by the IR or heat of incandescent bulbs. I am going to try some outside this year in Missouri and see what happens.