Friday, July 20, 2012

Excelerite

I read about this product somewhere online and decided to contact the company - US Rare Earth Minerals.  http://us-rem.com/  They graciously sent me some of their products to test out at The Field Lab.  As soon as some other projects are out of the way, I will set up an Excelerite experiment in the greenhouse.  84,98,68,0,C,0

12 comments:

USRareEarthMinerals said...

We cant wait to see how Excelerite works for you in the Texas desert. Need some more information just let us know. We look forward to talking to everyone.

Just Me said...

I hope you'll make it at least a 3-way test to compare a control group with Excelerite and also with our local bentonite. It's funny to me that we live within 10 miles of two major bentonite mines yet you are bringing the stuff in in fancy packaging for a field lab test.

tffnguy said...

Sounds like a reasonable request to me.

USRareEarthMinerals said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
USRareEarthMinerals said...

Apologize regarding the above post. Hit the submit button before editing. While both Bentonite and Excelerite (name brands of Montmorillonite clay) there are many differences, amount of npk, number of trace minerals, etc.

Dani said...

John - I'm confused. Just me is talking about bentonite - which makes me think of your dam. But - you're going to use it in your greenhouse? What's the connection?

Allen Hare said...

Will be interesting to see the development of these experiments. The stuff looks promising.

USRareEarthMinerals said...

@Dani - There are many different types of Bentonite for many different applications from cat litter to medical laxatives. I believe that the type of bentonite used in gardening is calcium bentonite.

Just Me said...

There's a pretty decent write-up about bentonite and montmorillonite here. Excelerite is a brand name. Bentonite is a more generic term for a smectite clay with a mixture of components, the primary one being Monmorillonite which is a specific crystalline chemical structure. Depending on the environment in which the clay formed, it can include a wide variety of trace elements. As a mineral clay, it is not expected to contain any nitrogen or phosphorous and the amount of potassium is variable. Its physical properties make the smectite clays pretty much interchangable for absorbent uses - like sealing a well head or dam, kitty litter, oil absorbent, wound packing, medical detox, etc. The variations in trace mineral content makes some deposits better than others as a soil amendment. A really pure Monmorillonite would be pretty useless as a soil amendment unless your soil was really low in calcium. The trace elements that are beneficial are considered impurities in the crystal structure of the clay.

Dani said...

Thanks USREM and JM - all is clear now :)

EXCELERITE said...

I look forward to seeing your results, I know after reading plenty of research documents that all of the scientist refer to the Panaca source which the brand name is Excelerite is the best in the world. Plus what other have are not eatable or approved for animal or Ag as Organic which is also very important. I just know personally that I have seeing first hand that Excelerite is amazing

tffnguy said...

SPAM! I'd never allow this on my blog or web site.