Thursday, June 9, 2016

TBT

Throw back Thursday from another life.  Having lunch with stylist Tonne Goodman at the Eiffel Tower circa 1986.  I was second assistant to Bruce Webber on a Calvin Klein shoot in Paris. Tonne is now fashion director at Vogue/Conde Nast - New York.  My one year in the high fashion world certainly presented a lot of opportunity - but luckily, I never bought into the hype.  88,98,70,0,B

20 comments:

Janet said...

You have certainly had an amazing life. I guess you needed a good dose of reality i.e. West Texas. Tonne has a "high fashion" face. She just looks the part.

I guess you couldn't have chosen a more opposite lifestyle. Does Tonne where you live?

Margery Bills said...

Yep, every dog has his day. Ha, ha. Well, that's part of the journey of life and I am so grateful.

Dizzy-Dick said...

High fashion where you live now are long horns on steers and cowboy hats and boots on people. Much better than Paris, right???

JohnnyM said...

Beauties/ intelligence/contacts vs talent on your part intelligence to be beyond talent of photography, straight on abilities of professionalism of photography. Knowing as you have said getting out being more you have achievements of greatness. Just because the air flights haven't been enough to date you can still fly the skies with more lightweight gear available today or another year or two to one. Stay & be of strong Mind & muscle.

Rita B. said...

I'm hearing strains of "Those were the days my friend, we thought they'd never end...."

coffeebottlerocket said...

I've had a lot of different jobs and lived in many different places. I have also been over halfway around the world and been to countries many have not heard of and seen ruins from countless wars in the Middle East and Persian Gulf. I have seen beautiful women in Southern Spain and starving refugee's in East Africa. I always wanted a life of adventure and I had it. Now I kinda live like 'Hemingway' in Florida. I gotta say that I am not a manic-depressive drunk. A beach bum, yes but not a drunk.

Maybe one day I will set up shop in Terlingua.

Margery Bills said...

Can you imagine that in 20 years there should be water in Terlingua? I think they should drill some more periodic deep wells out there where people can go to buy water. At least they are starting to get electricity in a few places. They did not put the water pipes in before because of the minor earthquake tremors.

Margery Bills said...

I saw a water delivery truck out there. It was careening around corners bumping mightily over rocky dirt roads. Water bottles were clanging on the side and breaking as water spewed out from all sides of the truck as the load shifted. What a sight. The driver was in a hurry to deliver before 5p.m. evidently when everyone disappears and everything shuts down when the highway soon becomes filled with wild animals at dusk.

Wyowanderer said...

Luck had nothing to do with it, John.

Ronald Mahan said...

-----Somewhat of an exaggeration by Margery Bills! Highway 118, the main road between Alpine & Study Butte, normally has some people travelling that road - even after dark and they normally outnumber the seen wild animals. Of course, if Margery was talking about the 1100 miles of dirt and gravel roads on Terlingua Ranch (as a highway), it is probable that nobody will help rescue you - until the next day - and those animals will keep you from being lonesome!

Margery Bills said...

Maybe it was mating season because at dusk there were too many jack rabbits on the road and I could not drive fast.

Margery Bills said...

170 into Big Bend at 2a.m. was empty of anything and I saw the most beautiful Elk standing by the side of the highway, probably from a safe haven ranch, because the Elk were killed to keep them from eating the plants. What a pity.

Margery Bills said...

The desert is a God forsaken hell hole. Go there in the summer and when you go outside in the afternoon, you will be in Hell. For some, that would be an exaggeration. I met 2 Mormans here by San Antonio at 4p.m. And their faces were bright red and profusely sweating (buckets). They said they did not mind because it was for God.


Margery Bills said...

And this is only June and not even hot. More to come.

Ronald Mahan said...

The ranch which is located on Nine Points Mesa was sold to a Budweiser distributor - who made it into a large game farm - to entertain his large beer purchasers (multiple truck loads). However, they failed to build their fences stout enough to keep those huge imported elk confined to their Nine Points Mesa home range. There are lots of those critters in the Cedar Springs range of Terlingua Ranch. I have seen them in the Nine Points Mesa Draw near my property, and also their tracks on my property - with water guzzlers supplied by water catchments! The interesting thing - is they can be killed by anyone with a valid Texas hunting permit - any time of the year - as long as you own the property where the elk is shot - or have written permission to hunt there! The Game & Fish wardens consider them an invasive species - like aoudads - that compete with the native mule deer population. Happy hunting!

Margery Bills said...

Interesting.

leilani said...

You worked for Bruce Weber?

Wow. You're full of surprises, Mister.

I don't suppose you also got to go on the Calvin Klein shoot on Santorini where that iconic photo of some athlete ( famous at-the-time I guess) in his Calvins against the white stucco wall was taken?

Even if you didn't, I should say you've led a very interesting life, sir.

John Wells said...

The was a bit before my time. I did see the famous spot in Santorini a couple years later working for Doug Ordway (he was first assistant to Bruce during my tenure) when he got a gig shooting for a British travel agency called Best Of Greece.

John Wells said...

https://iconicphotos.wordpress.com/2010/06/26/ck-tom-hintnaus/

leilani said...

Yup, that's the one. Santorini's exquisite, isn't it? And the light! I can see why a photographer would choose it if he had a rich client.

I visited there on one of those 10-day island hopping cruises and that was the one I wanted to come back to stay on. Came oh so verrrrry close to getting "lost" & letting my boat leave without me, in fact.

A return trip is still on my bucket list waiting to get crossed off someday.