Saturday, June 13, 2015

thirsty bees

78,100,72, .32",B

10 comments:

Margery Bills said...

I have seen a few wasps showing up here and their old nests are still up. i hope they keep on going.

Sam Finn said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Bob from Athens said...

This looks like the ones that nest in the ground and get VERY, VERY mad when disturbed

Larry G said...

we call them yellow jackets in the east and yes they will make sure you knew they were not happy

J said...

They appear to be wasps, not bees.

Rev.jimmyleebob said...

Those are african killer bees. If they get after you, you will wish they were yellow jackets.

Sam Finn said...

Apparently flying around southwest Texas can be thirsty work.

James Price said...

The Rev. appears to be correct.

Larry G said...

yup. as a child I used to accompany my Uncles who, every year would find a "bee tree" and we'd all group up with a chain saw and a galvanized tub. An hour later, give or take, we'd have a tub full of honey and comb and everyone would have their share of bee stings and swollen body parts!

I'm sure those bees were not near as nasty as these African guys... but last year, I turned over a piece of plywood and though I ran like hell several hundred feet away - I still got a couple dozen stings even as I was 200 feet away! Reminded me of my bee tree days!

Steve said...

It's virtually impossible to tell if these are africanized bees from a photo. Typically the determination is made in a lab (FABIS method). There is a field method which checks forewing and femur lengths as well as weight, but can be somewhat inaccurate.

Yes, I keep bees. And yes, those appear to be honey bees.