Monday, August 1, 2016

Chupa on top...

Ever since I started training Chupa to jump up on my arm, he goes for the high road whenever he gets a chance.  If he sees me bending over while working on something in the yard, he makes his move and I end up with a rooster on my back.  Today he worked his way up to my head.  83,94,69,0,B

19 comments:

JohnnyM said...

He loves the security & high point of surveillance

Deborah Hall said...

I love chupa, he is so awesome. He is one smart roster for sure...

Rita B. said...

Glad you had the hat on. Those look like some strong claws. Handsome fella.

Janet said...

It may also be "pecking order" or rooster dominance. Looks like Chupa is winning.

John Wells said...

He actually drew blood climbing up there...

Margery Bills said...

You say you are all functioning normally out there? Is he showing his dominance over you? He thinks he owns you and you are his.
Be careful. He is probably pretty heavy on your neck when he jumps on your head or back. Be careful of the sun too. :-)

Mr Regulator said...

One smart chicken!

Gene Adcock said...

FUN picture John. Tnx for sharing.

Todd said...

Best picture in a long time. Really Enjoy that big smile on your face John!

Ann Poucher said...

What a great friend. I love that Chupa.

Ronald Mahan said...

Maybe it is my childhood memories of my Grandmother's mean roosters - but I do not think I could let a rooster claw his way to the top of my head. And if a rooster drew my blood - the evening meal would probably be rooster - and home made dumplings! Still use my Grandmother's recipe for this great dish! Heck, we often could not wait - and had to sample a few dumplings - before they finished drying on her kitchen prep table! Homemade dumplings must be properly dried - before they are added to the cooked chicken broth! Maybe Grandmother made extra dumplings - because her finished dish always had plenty of dumplings - despite our raids.

Janet said...

It is all about the dumplings. I didn't know you had to dry them first because my mother didn't do that. We ate them anyway. Just my husband and I (no roosters around) so we just buy cornish hens and make "cornish hen" dumplings. Still good.

Margery Bills said...

Happy memories Ronald. So much that some young people miss today. We had big old fashioned houses to visit in S.E. Ohio where the table was laden with home cooked food. And I tasted the most delicious water from the water pump. And I remember the stories that the women told about shelling vegetables on the front porch, canning meat, plowing the field behind a horse, warming the cold feather bedding (which I slept snuggled between) in the loft with hot coals from the wood stove in the kitchen, hitching the horse to the sleigh or wagon to go to town, and so on. Days gone by and people no longer here. When I last visited Ohio, there were Texas trucks careening at a precarious angle around curves in the road and all the oil drilling and smells, and some abandoned wood structures in disrepair. The government wants to get the Applachian hillbillies out of there and up to modern times. A cracker fractory is planned for Lewisville. The Amish have moved to PA. There is enough oil to supply the U.S. for the next 40 years. My distant Warren cousins have an oil co. there and frack near Dexter City.

Janet said...

Hey Ronald. Would love to have your grandmother's dumpling recipe. (No offense Chupa) and I don't mean to take over John's blog, but he might like to make some beef, uh pork, uh vegetarian dumplings. (Excuse me Ben and Jave).

Ronald Mahan said...

---Janet----Here is Grandma Schober's recipe for Dumplings. Exactly as written by Pat Mahan (my wife)- about 50 years ago. ------------------ Flour, Baking Powder (small amount), Salt to taste. Crisco (small amount), Egg, Milk. ---------------------------Roll & let dry as for egg noodles. Cut and drop in broth. Preferable to use a hen. Add a small amount of parsley when cooking hen.----------------------------------------Sorry about the lack of specific amounts to use - but that would depend on the amount of dumplings being made. But this lack of detail did not stop those great cooks - from making great dumplings. -------------------------------------------------- Margery Bill --- My grandmother also owned & operated a very large room & boarding house in Marlin, Texas - which had been built by her parents. The house was built before Marlin had water for residents - and had a large underground brick lined cistern which stored water from the large roof. After Marlin started providing city water - Grandma also got on the city water line - but kept using the catchment water for special jobs, because it was much better quality than the city water - i.e. had fewer minerals in it.

Janet said...

Thanks Ronald. This leaves room for a LOT of experimentation. Your wife must be a great cook!

Ronald Mahan said...

---- THANK YOU! I believe my Grandmother (my father's mother) was the great cook. She cooked daily for her family - and 6 to 12 others depending on the number of room & board guests she had. And I never saw her use a recipe - which partially explains why there is - "room for a LOT of experimentation" - in her instructions for us amateur cooks! CHEERS

Margery Bills said...

Oh yes Ronald. I saw the cistern in back of one house I looked at but it had some boards over it and the people grimaced when they talked about it as if it embarrassed them because they have tap water now with the big old fashioned bathtub and indoor plumbing. But I was told years ago that rain water catchment was the best thing to wash your hair in. I actually found some canned peaches in the cellar and a grandmother clock in the attic. Made me sad holding them as if the past and the people would transfer back to me and how hard they worked. And I cried in the cemetary looking at my ancestors inscriptions from the 1800's. They lived on the north and south of the Ohio River (north and south) and even today they are one only group-Applachian Americans (original English hillbillies who went there from New England in the late 1700's once they could get past the warpath Indians).

Ronald Mahan said...

-----Margery -- And all the women at Grandma's house - also used the nice soft rainwater for their hair washing - despite the fact they had to get the good stuff with a bucket and rope from the cistern. But that was not a long haul- because the family bathroom was about six steps from the cistern water source. Looks as though my great grandparents built wisely - so they could bathe without having to work too hard. And yes - it had the big iron porcelain clad bathtub standing on claw feet.