Friday, December 3, 2010

The Plan

Thanks for all the suggestions - some were pretty dang close to my solution.  I must say that I really liked RJ's concept the best!  When I bought the materials, I also purchased end strips to correspond to the wave forms of the materials - foam inserts for the corrugated metal and plastic for the polycarbonate.  Tomorrow I am picking up some 2" flat stock steel 1/8" thick for the transition.  I loosely pieced together some parts to show the plan, using an aluminum strait edge in place of the steel flats.  I am lining up and  laying down the flat stock first (white primed to inhibit rust) and screwing through the foam into the peeks of the corrugated metal .  Then I will offset the plastic end pieces and screw down the polycarbonate into the flat stock.  The unions will overlap the corrugated metal about 4" at the top and on the south side.  Will add caulk as needed.  If none of this makes any sense - just wait and see how it all comes together. Sometimes it is hard to put into words the precise details in my noggin.

7 comments:

Dizzy-Dick said...

A man with the plan. Don't you just love it when a plan comes together.

Bruce S said...

Great plan. It's not the problem. It's how you react to the problem and you excelled.

JLP said...

Good plan. Actually, you could probably get by with regular galvanized, 12" rolled flashing instead of the 1/8" flat steel. I transitioned a steel patio roof from a composit shingle roof this way. Of course I only had to use the foam sealers on the steel side. It worked out well and has been up two years without leaking and has been subjected to some heavy wind/rain.

fallerya said...

But, but...

Ted said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Allen Hare said...

Well, that was quick. With most roofing material, you start laying it down from the bottom, overlapping the next layer as you work up towards the ridge line. You had a problem from the get-go by leaving that gap in the middle. I guess you couldn't tuck that polycarbonate up under the corrugated material above it, then overlap it over the row below. Looking forward to seeing the pics once everything's in place and screwed down. It's been windy up here - I hope it didn't cause you too much trouble down your way. Handling those large sheets 'o material in the wind could be a drag. As usual, good luck with all!

Carl said...

ah, so your saying (sin a)+(sin (a+b)) = covered hole. got it. :O)