Sunday, October 2, 2011

Monarch Sunday



























Saw a butterfly this morning - then another, and another, and another...  Lost count after 200.  Quite a few decided to hang out down in the swamp today.  Plenty of water and flowers for them.  79,89,54,0,B(utterflys)

13 comments:

Ted said...

John one fall day about 45 years ago at Rockwall Texas on my ten acres there were thousands a sight I will never forget.If you ever study the Monarch's you'll be amazed at thier migration.Good memories

Dizzy-Dick said...

I have been lucky enough to see their migration, also. Very impressive. There were thousands landing in trees to spend the night. Tall tree motel. . .

RedEyeMule said...

Amazing.

Judith said...

I am very glad to hear there is something for them where you are. There is very little here in central Texas. I have seen only one, and I hope the rest of them are finding a better road south.

deguello said...

Beautiful word in any language: Marisosa, Papillon, Butterfly.

mike said...

There was a lot of them in our area this summer (Oregon)

Terry said...

We happened to see a migration of them down near Lake Amistad where the huge bridge is located just beyond there. They were coming up thru that canyon...I think it's the Devils River. Awesome sight I'll never forget..

tffnguy said...

Been seeing a few here to, but no big numbers.

Cindy said...

Mariposa Parade

GYPSY JESS said...

So cool! Dan and I saw a huge monarch storm on I 10 last year. I don't remember when it was, but it was raining butterflys.:)

2 Dogs said...

That "swamp" is look'in pretty sad. I think ya got more of a puddle than anything else. Hopefully them government employees will be able to get it fixed up for ya. Either that or your gonna have to git some hogs.

PS
Hide the still when them government people come out or else they will report it to the Revenuers and they will come and bust it up.

Coot said...

Been a few here at Ft. Clark, but no big numbers!

Allen Hare said...

I guess you are on their flyway for their annual migration south into Mexico. They are a lovely, inspirational sight, so fragile, and yet mighty in numbers and determination.