Monday, January 2, 2012

Luna lunes...

Lots of visitors today....only happened to photograph the last.  SwampGirl is heading back to NY tomorrow - she came by with our friends Cynthia and her daughter Luna.  After having just met Benita - Luna tried to wrap her little head around what it must be like to have long horns.







Trying some organic Quinoa for the first time tonight with some soup.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quinoa 
47,60,28,0,B

8 comments:

BBC said...

Don't suppose I'll be trying Quinoa any time soon. I've always been a meat and spuds country boy that enjoys some booze also.

The old gal next door is the same way, minus the booze and she'll be 90 this year.

Oh well, done enough, seen enough, not even trying to get old. My good gene have kept me here longer than I've wanted to be here at times.

AnnieWorks said...

Did Luna think you were Santa Claus?

Pablo said...

those are beautifull ladies dude...need to be from NY (where yu come i was born) WOW Luna and daugther...xxxxx

Pablo said...

ON QUINOA : ( your Wilkipedia link)Derived from the Spanish spelling of the Quechua name kinwa or occasionally "Qin-wah", Quinoa originated in the Andean region of Ecuador, Bolivia, Colombia and Peru before they were colonized and became nation-states, where it was successfully domesticated 3,000 to 4,000 years ago for human consumption, though archeological evidence shows a non-domesticated association with pastoral herding some 5,200 to 7,000 years ago.[1]

Similar Chenopodium species, such as pitseed goosefoot (Chenopodium berlandieri) and fat hen (Chenopodium album), were grown and domesticated in North America as part of the Eastern Agricultural Complex before maize agriculture became popular.[2] Fat hen, which has a widespread distribution in the Northern Hemisphere, produces edible seeds and greens much like quinoa, but in smaller quantities.

The nutrient composition is very good compared with common cereals. Quinoa grains contain essential amino acids like lysine and good quantities of calcium, phosphorus, and iron.[3]

After harvest, the grains need to be processed to remove the coating containing the bitter-tasting saponins. Quinoa grains are in general cooked the same way as rice and can be used in a wide range of dishes. Quinoa leaves are also eaten as a leaf vegetable, much like amaranth, but the commercial availability of quinoa greens is limited

Rev.JimmyLeeBob said...

You seem to attract the chicks with
the superfly goggles.....

mike said...

Weird sun glasses lol

Rita B. said...

and if you don't care for the Quinoa, maybe the girls (Ms's B & B) would like to try it?

Allen Hare said...

I've said it before. You ARE a chick magnet. I rather like the sunglasses. The little one is way cute. Love her pink cowgirl boots.

Looks like you've discovered a near perfect food there. Looking forward to your review.