Monday, June 12, 2017

a monday matinee...


99,102,76,0,B

14 comments:

John Wells said...

Final test of the new Pepino swamp cooler. For this test the pump cycle was set to 29 seconds on / 100 seconds off. Total elapsed time was 5 1/2 minutes which is a little too long to stare at so I edited out a little. Still pretty swift cooling considering. Their was no edit from the beginning to the initial drop of the temperature. It happened fast because I had already run some water through the pad. A twenty degree drop is about the best you can do with a swamp cooler although I can max it out at about 25° on days when the humidity is below 10%. When this Pepino gets installed for the new owner, a second cooler will be used instead of my now famous bucket. Here is a basic parts list. Coolers: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0006H5B06/ Pump: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01AAFUJOQ/ Timer circuit: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00VR1F3LC/ Evaporative pad: https://www.growerssupply.com/farm/supplies/prod1;gs_cooling_fans-gs_evaporative_coolers;pg109009_109009.html Fans: You can find these at any number of surplus electronics websites - just don't buy them from RadioShack or you will pay way too much. News Theme by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/...) Artist: http://incompetech.com/

Steve said...

Ive seen small 12v squirrel cage fans. I'm wondering if one of them might be quieter and blow more air using less electricity?
Always been a fan of swamp coolers.
Originally from Nevada where they always worked quite well, fast and energy efficient, while providing delicious cool air. Too bad they can't be used in humid climates.

Sam Finn said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
John Wells said...

I seem to get the most bang for my buck with the fans I am using. After 8 years I am so used to the sound of fans that it is almost too quiet when they are off. These fans produce the perfect amount of airflow for the size of my swamp cooler. More or less flow only reduces the cooling effect.

kkw said...

I grew up in Puckett Field about 35 miles south and east of Fort Stockton in the 70s, and we only had swamp coolers. I don't remember it ever being unbearably hot in our house, even with windows open in the summer. Without humidity, they work like a charm. I hope these pan out for you. With such a small space to cool, you should be good to go.

I've only recently subscribed to your YT channel, and I'm hooked! But I have to ask... how do you do your laundry?

John Wells said...

Thanks for subscribing to my channel. I have used a Pepino for 8 years. I only have to fire up real AC for an hour or two in the late afternoon for a couple of weeks out of the year. Once we start getting a string of days of 100+ temps, my swamp cooler just can't keep up. The nice thing about it is that it cools down my hut for comfortable sleeping once the sun goes down and the temperature drops. I do my laundry at the laundromat - just like normal people...

Margery Bills said...

Great job.

Margery Bills said...

Great job. But I would like to see you have a new one. It seems better than your old one. Could you use two coolers for longer or better cooling?

John Wells said...

It works exactly the same as my old one...two would work a little better but would require twice as much water.

Road said...

Very cool. My mind is working on how best to adapt/modify your Pepino design as a mobile unit for an overland style campervan.

Still thinking about a lazy sunny afternoon, cool-as-a-cucumber Pepino character, too, and have suggested to other artists in my family that they ponder it as well.

Heh, we do a lot of pondering, my little 3gen family unit. Sometimes something comes of it.

Sam Finn said...

Road ... family pondering is a wonderful thing!

Mark Nanneman said...

Does the swamp cooler lead to any condensation, moisture issues in the hut?

Mark Nanneman said...

Also, is anyone out there using a qanat/wind tower set up? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Qanat

John Wells said...

Mark...While Pepino does raise the humidity a bit inside, it does not lead to "moisture issues". On really hot days the outside humidity is about 10% and the inside goes up to about 45%. Qanats are used primarily for irrigation of crops and no one really grows anything in any volume that require massive irrigation. They are also very expensive to construct. The folks out here that have water wells just use standard pumps powered either by the grid or solar. (I should note that the Lajitas golf course pumps a million gallons per day to keep their grass looking good for the rich folks that fly in on their Lear jets for a weekend of golf.) No one uses wind tower technology due to the high excavation costs. Geothermal cooling requires a huge/deep underground source to provide enough volume for an effective airflow.