Friday, April 8, 2011

talcum powder road...

Worked on a soft/dusty puddle in my driveway today to try and firm it up.  Every time I drive through, it explodes into a cloud of dust and gets bigger every time I pass.  Poured about 50 gallons of my old creek water on it today to soak in and pack hopefully.  Not really talcum powder but seems to have many of the same characteristics:  It occurs as foliated to fibrous masses, its monoclinic crystals being so rare as to be almost unknown. It has a perfect basal cleavage, and the folia are non-elastic, although slightly flexible. It is the softest known mineral on the Mohs hardness; allowing it to be easily scratched by a fingernail. It is also sectile (can be cut with a knife). It has a specific gravity of 2.5–2.8, a clear or dusty luster, and is translucent to opaque. (from Wikipedia)

Inspired by the partial success of the waterboxx project - I'm prepping some palo verde seeds of my own for germination.  They are almost 2 years old - hope they are still viable.  I got these from a tree in my Crazy Aunt Jean's back yard in Circle City, AZ.  Jean and I shared the same birth date...she passed away last year so we no longer have a chance to call and wish each other happy birthday.  Some offspring from her tree would be a nice addition to TFL.  Her memoir from the great depression is still available through Amazon.com.  http://www.amazon.com/Colorado-Whoopenhollars-Living-Despite-Depression/dp/1441529896  87,96,64,0,W

10 comments:

JCK said...

Crazy Aunt Jean sounds intriguing.

Love that shot!

tffnguy said...

Its a lot worse on the road getting here. I'm thinking about getting a motor boat.

markiesparkie said...

That's what I like about your blog. You present things in a more scientific manner than the average bear, and simple things like dusty dust become creationary evidence that most any wonderer can appreciate.
Wonder if the stuff can be grid-cut with a chain saw like igloo blocks and used as an engineering material?!
Doin' great, John.

Ted said...

There for a little bit I thought you had been in to so peyote.

Eric said...

I wish you success with your tree germination... a great tribute to Crazy Aunt Jean, to have them line your place.

daPrinc said...

John, try putting a pile of the rocks you chipped out to level the water tanks on the greenhouse in the "talcum power" spot. Sometimes when you mix rocks with fine material and then wet it down it will become almost like concrete. Tires of the vehicles will also roll over the tops of the rocks and not disturb the fine dust as much as well.

Bel said...

Doesn't everyone have a crazy aunt? We have crazy Aunt Sue in our family. (literally call her that, not to her face of course) Although, I'm thinking as time goes by, I'll be the crazy aunt to my nieces and nephews! That 'talcum powder' road scares me a little!

Bob from Athens said...

You may want to get some method of mixing the water into that dust. Something like a old harrow or disc. Otherwisr most of the water just sits on the top and evaporates pretty quick.

Cindy said...

Well I finally broke down and bought the book... can't wait to read the family stories!

mostlymichael said...

Thanks for sharing.

Up here in central Canada, we used to spray old oil onto really dusty roads. If it rained, the oil stayed on top and the water soaked through. Keeps the dust down real well and the smell dissipates within a week.

Cheers.

Mike

www.mostlymichael.com