Monday, March 2, 2015

spring migration

49,61,40,0,B

13 comments:

remmij said...

better than a paper calendar

remmij said...

I forgot - since you have a bit more time… was reading the NYT piece on Nimoy and thought you might get a kick out of this - an interesting chain -
John Walking Fox
“Dif-tor heh smusma”
_\// R
SHIN

Larry G said...

seems to early to head north! what kind of birds?

Rev.jimmyleebob said...

Still have 1 month to go before spring migration begins here ( snow birds ).

Margery Bills said...

Nice picture.

Larry G said...

down in our neck of the woods - we have flock after flock of Canadian Geese... we also have many other big birds, Snowy, Tundra, and others.

they all like good-sized lakes... and rivers... though.. so maybe they take a break on the Rio Grande on their way north and look for the Red or Canadian rivers on their way north down that way.

anthony murphy said...

Anyone know why one side of the V is all ways longer than the other ?

Margery Bills said...

Would those birds be Blue-Winged Teal.

everyman said...

124 1/2 birds ... I think.

Margery Bills said...

Lol everyman

dave said...

Yes Anthony because there are more birds on one side.

edlfrey said...

Anthony,
Best Answer: The geese at either side of the V has an aerodynamic advantage. It does not matter which side, as long as there is a goose flying in front of another in the formation. The lead goose expends the most energy and they take turns being the lead. Since aerodynamic efficiency does not depend on the shape of the V, there is no disadvantage to have one arm of the V longer than the other. If there is no disadvantage, then there is no natural selection to make sure that geese fly in formations with equal numbers of geese at each arm of the formation. Whenever there is a lack of natural selection, natural variation can exist.

Keely said...

I love watching the geese in action . Thanks for sharing your pic with us !