Friday, March 11, 2011

quarry glamour

Got caught up on the last rush of emails then tended to computer file sorting.  Waited till the sun worked its way away from the work zone.  Late shade shift clearing rock and finally down to the level to fit a tank in for the north gutter.  Funny how such a small clearing job creates such a huge pile of debris.  Now I have to wheel barrow in a bunch of sand for a level tank pad.  This next effort brings to mind (thanks to my friend JD)  a related scene in the movie Cool Hand Luke.  The sun is starting to set now in the zone that catches my front porch so it was time to replace the west porch shade panel.  The new greenhouse roof will provide sunrise shade on the east side of the porch for about another 2 weeks.  69,82,39,0,C 

14 comments:

Judith said...

That is the tidiest, tightest canvas shade panel I have ever seen. Fine work. But then you appear to be a craftsman in general. A little water sloshed on there....welcome cool in July. Glad to see you haven't slacked off just because of the NYT.

frakier said...

I was reading survivalblog.com and noticed a reference to you blog by way of the new york times article.

The site is run by James Wesley, Rawles author of "Patriots". Good site, JWR acts as moderator so you do not get people fighting and nitpicking over things. He picks the articles and posts them, the conversations are on various subjects from off the grid living to being prepared for well anything.

Susanna said...

That is a beautiful picture with the rocks. Astonishing colors and an unusual mix of harsh and soft light. Wow!

anne dinan said...

im enjoying reading about your adventures.

Caribe704 said...

Was told by a friend in Dallas about your article in the Ft. Worth paper, I admire your tenacity making it happen in West Texas,, very impressive, then saw aticles by locals about your gifts of solar bread, you are the man! Do Your chiles dry outside there as well as they do in Albuquerque?

Larry said...
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rj said...
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celine secada said...

Fascinated by the choice you've made, Mr. John Wells, formerly from Brooklyn (I used to work in DUMBO...). I always figured I would so something similar as well, but in an less desolate area such as the rain forest, surrounded by vegetation and all kinds of creatures, big and small, but with my in-door felines. I wouldn't miss people so much, except my kid, dad & stepmom and a few friends. I love to talk...to people, my cats, and whoever is around, including myself. How do you handle the "aloneness," part of your living arrangement. I am not talking about the Solitude, that I get. But not having the immediate response from another living being...

Andre Esteves said...
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Andre Esteves said...

"Funny how such a small clearing job creates such a huge pile of debris"

Maybe you can use the debris to anchor more The tanks... It seems to be an unforgiving job to crack that bedrock... :( Why not use the egiptian method?

After making holes on the rock, place tight wood wedges in the holes and water then. The water Imbibition of the wood will make the wedges expand and crack the rock betwen the holes. As that rock seems to be divided in lots of planes , the cracked rock would be easily lifted (i could be wrong)

Been following your adventures for the last few years and just would like to say that you are an inspiration!

Andre Esteves, Portugal, Europe

Mike and Linda Chiconsky said...

I read the article about your experience on Jetson Green. I'm finding your blogs incredibly interesting! I'd love to find out what your thoughts are on good solar panels.

Cindy said...

Great Shade Panel and I must say I agree with Judith, you are an impressive craftsman.

Found you through a link of a friend to the NYT piece and am still reading blog posts but am caught up througn 2009.
Check email for recipes in more than fair trade ;) thanks
ct

small said...
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Jean said...

What kind of rocks are those? We have granite chunks around here; can't imagine even trying to move rocks that size without big machines. Maybe Bonita would like a drinking fountain edged by native field stone?